5 reasons why cloud computing makes enterprises more flexible

With increasing popularity, cloud technology is being viewed as an essential tool to help businesses turn challenges into their own opportunities.

With increasing popularity, cloud technology is being viewed as an essential tool to help businesses turn challenges into their own opportunities.

The application of "cloud computing" in business is a long process. In general, most enterprises now understand what the basic concept of cloud computing is, how it works and what it means. With increasing popularity, cloud technology is being viewed as an essential tool to help businesses turn challenges into their own opportunities.

These are 5 reasons that enterprises become more flexible thanks to cloud computing.

Promoting technology innovation

When enterprises focus primarily on IT resources to maintain available devices and on-site solutions that will push your business into a defensive position - operate cautiously, even keeping the entire system smooth operation also requires a great effort.

Cloud-based solutions are the driving force behind innovation in the technology industry, from deployment, operation to technology partner support. Now, you can take advantage of new features more easily and save more than before. If an initiative is feasible, you can deploy it on a large scale to target a larger customer scale. Conversely, if it fails, the project can be canceled quickly.Empowering employees

To make the work more efficient, faster and more flexible, more and more employees turn to personal applications in addition to business management software. For example, personal mobile devices are used to connect to the corporate network, group members use accounts to share information and project management tools to help the project become more convenient.

Simply understanding that employees are applying cloud computing solutions to the functions they need, they are familiar but the IT department cannot respond. What can cloud computing do for us? With appropriate cloud platform applications, organizations can help employees do their jobs better, faster, smarter and facilitate closer cooperation.

Scaling up to the globe

Cloud computing solutions allow new enterprises to quickly scale up operations in most areas without having to invest in equipment there, which significantly reduces both investment capital and risk.

In addition, enterprises can easily achieve business goals because cloud computing allows remote offices to closely connect with business units and other headquarters. Therefore, information is also easier to share whether the partner or supplier is anywhere.

Simplifying complianceThe constant updating of software changes, security issues and regulations is not only complicated and manual, but also expensive. These are the aspects that cloud computing can solve and also bring outstanding benefits for enterprises that wish to increase productivity and reduce risks. For example, SaaS platform services, new security updates, and regulations can be automatically disseminated to the entire organization as soon as the update is completed. This approach also brings great value to multinational enterprises in addressing the complex and costly challenges of each country's rules and regulations.

Offering 24x7x365 continuous service

According to Dun and Bradstreet, up to 59% of Fortune 500 companies must temporarily cease (downtime) at least 1.6 hours/week. That means these businesses take up to more than 70 hours of operation in a year and losses of up to $ 46 million / year.

In today's economy, downtime means revenue loss. The enterprises cannot let the application stop working if there is no connection. An appropriate cloud computing solution can meet the needs of employees anytime, anywhere, 24x7x365. No matter where they are or what equipment they use, the business system is running more smoothly and the downtime time is dramatically reduced. As a result, enterprise applications and services become more reliable than companies using on-site solutions.

By: Jonath Martin